September 2021

NATIVE PLANTS & HOMEGROWN VEGETABLES
A Horticulture Bench Show

September 8, 2021
10 am – 12 pm


ENTRY RULES AND GUIDELINES

  1. All plant material must be fresh and grown by the exhibitor unless otherwise noted.
  2. Exhibitors are encouraged to give notice of their intent to submit by noon the day before the show. Give notice to Horticulture Committee Chair, Pam Wright.
  3. Exhibitors must provide their own clear glass container for cut specimens.
  4. White paper plates for vegetable exhibits will be provided by the committee.
  5. Exhibits must have been in the possession of the exhibitor for no fewer than 90 days. Exception: plants grown from seed, seedling, or immature transplants, bulbs, tubers, corms, or rhizomes.
  6. All SGC Community Project Garden exhibit entries are welcome—please note garden on entry card.
  7. GCA entry cards listing plant material by botanical binomials and common names must be submitted with entry. Templates and printable entry cards are available on the SGC & GCA websites.
  8. All plant material must be correctly identified with the botanical and common names, if possible. Accepted references for nomenclature are:
  9. Entry cards must be filled out in advance with waterproof ink, pencil, or printed out with GCA template.
  10. All entries must be accepted and passed between 8:00 and 8:45am prior to the start of the Membership Meeting. Entries that do not pass will be displayed, but not judged.
  11. Judging will begin at 8:45am.
  12. Late entries (after passing has closed) will be displayed, but not judged.
  13. Exhibitor may make more than one entry per class, if each is a different genus, species, variety/cultivar, type, size, or color.
  14. Double potting is permitted but the inner pot must not be visible.
  15. Wedging is permitted. Wedging may be visible but must not detract from the cut specimen. Additional wedging will be provided by Committee.
  16. All entries must be removed by exhibitor at the end of the meeting.
  17. Plants included on the CT Invasive Plant list will not be accepted. https://cipwg.uconn.edu/invasive_plant_list/
  18. Endangered, Threatened or Species of Special Concern in CT will be accepted only if they have not been collected in the wild and/or are commercially available cultivars or nativars. https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Endangered-Species/Endangered-Species

CLASSES

Where flowers bloom, so does hope. – Lady Bird Johnson

Classes I-III, cut specimens not to exceed 30” in length

Class I:  Native Plants Grown for Flower

Class II:  Native Plants Grown for Foliage

Class III:  Native Plants Grown for Fruit

Class IV:  Homegrown Vegetables

Subdivision 1. A single specimen presented on a white paper plate.

Subdivision 2. Collection of a minimum of five (5) different specimens judged for their cultural perfection. Presented on white paper plates. Collection not to exceed 18” in length, width or depth.

Subdivision 3. Display of a minimum of five (5) different specimens exhibited with a strong overall artistic effect. Exhibited in individual containers, or the appearance of being individually exhibited. Display not to exceed 18” in length, width or depth. Height unlimited.

Class V: Herbs

Subdivision 1. A single cut specimen

Subdivision 2. Collection of a minimum of five (5) different specimens judged for their cultural perfection, exhibited in individual glass containers, not to exceed 18” in length, width or depth.

Subdivision 3. Display of a minimum of five (5) different specimens exhibited with a strong overall artistic effect. Exhibited in individual containers, or the appearance of being individually exhibited. Display not to exceed 18” in length, width or depth. Height unlimited.


RESOURCES

Definition of Native Plants:  A plant that is a part of the balance of nature that has developed over hundreds or thousands of years in a particular region or ecosystem. Note: The word native should always be used with a geographic qualifier (that is, native to New England [for example]). Only plants found in this country before European settlement are native to the United States. https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/ct/technical/ecoscience/invasive/?cid=nrcs142p2_011124



REFERENCES 

Native Plant Trust: https://gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org/

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center: https://www.wildflower.org/

Prairie Moon Nursery (good photos): https://www.prairiemoon.com/

GCA https://www.gcamerica.org/members/flower-show#resourceid=2980


Notes for September Bench Show:  

Judges will be advised that exhibits are native plants, intended to be used by pollinators, and should be judged accordingly.

Native hydrangeas include hydrangea arborescens and hydrangea quercifolia. Hydrangea arborescens, commonly known as smooth hydrangea, wild hydrangea, sevenbark, or in some cases, sheep flower, is a small- to medium-sized, deciduous shrub up to 3 m (10 ft) tall that is native to the eastern United States. Hydrangea quercifolia, commonly known as oakleaf hydrangea or oak-leaved hydrangea, is native to the southeastern United States, in woodland habitats from North Carolina west to Tennessee, and south to Florida and Louisiana.

Non-native hydrangeas, while beautiful, may not be entered in this bench show.

Non-native hydrangeas include hydrangea macrophylla and hydrangea paniculata. Hydrangea macrophylla is native to Japan, a deciduous shrub growing to 2 m (7 ft) tall by 2.5 m (8 ft) broad with large heads of pink or blue flowers in summer and autumn. Common names include bigleaf hydrangea, French hydrangea, lacecap hydrangea, mophead hydrangea, penny mac and hortensia. It is widely cultivated in many parts of the world in many climates and is responsible for much of New England’s grand displays. Hydrangea paniculata, the panicled hydrangea, is native to southern and eastern China, Korea, Japan and Russia. It is a deciduous shrub with cone shaped panicles of bracts. Common names include peegee, grandiflora, ‘Limelight’, ‘Bobo’, ‘Pinky Winky’ and ‘Quick Fire’.

Stonington Garden Club
P.O. Box 385
Stonington, CT, 06378
The Stonington Garden Club's objective is to educate and encourage interest in the environment, conservation, community projects and to stimulate the knowledge and love of gardening.